Dunlap Lake Property Owners Association Meeting July 31

The 7 p.m. Monday, July 31, Dunlap Lake Property Owners Association Meeting will be at 840 East Lake drive.
Dunlap Lake Property Owners Association Board Meeting Agenda
July 31, 2017
AGENDA
1. Roll call-
2. Approval of minutes – June 5, 2017
3. Guest comments
4. Old Business
a. Enforcing and Amending the DLPOA Covenants and Restrictions
i. Edwardsville Police Department
ii. Todd Billy, Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard
5. Financial Report
6. Committee Reports
a. Fish and Wildlife – Jim
b. Legal – Al
c. Meetings, Elections & Social – Genie
d. Restrictions – Roy
e. Safety – Mark
f. Silt & Erosion – Craig
g. Web Page – Todd
h. Building – Andy
i. Common Areas – Lee
j. Dam Maintenance – Mike
k. Fireworks-Mike
7. Manager’s Report
8. New Business –
a. Next meeting – ?
9. Adjournment

City to Pick Up Limbs

I hope you and your home were not hit too badly by the recent thunderstorms. I wanted to let you know that if you will place fallen limbs on the curb the City will have someone out to pick them up. Details on the City website.

Greenside had our grounds crew out this morning cutting up large limbs that have fallen on common areas. We would appreciate your assistance helping get the little stuff up to the street as well.

I have not had any emails about algae for some time now. If you have seen the paint-like scum on the surface anywhere please let me know. If not, we will be taking down the caution signs.

Thanks!
Carolyn Green

City Picks Up Limbs Week of July 24

Following the storm, limbs will be picked up this week by the city! A press release from the city asked residents to cut limbs into pieces no larger than six feet if possible and said clean-up will focus on the following areas: Grandview, Troy Road, Montclaire, Leclaire, Dunlap Lake, Steinmeyer, Schwarz Street and Esic. Smaller debris and leaves can be put into regular trash bags and will be handled by normal trash services.

Toxin Levels Lower in Deeper Water

EPA’s Report July 6, 2017

The EPA collected two samples on June 23rd. One was taken back along the shore where a blue-green algae bloom was reported and one was out in the mouth of the same cove. The level of microcystin (toxin) was:

  • 36.2 ug/L near the shore (as reported previously)
  • 0.38 ug/L In the mouth of the cove (as reported today)

Today’s e-mail from the EPA included these comments:
“Although microcystins were detected in this sample, they were detected at a much lower concentration compared to the sample collected near the resident’s dock (36.2 ug/L). The 0.38 ug/L concentration is well below all advisory thresholds associated with recreational risk due to microcystin exposure.

We are currently not planning to return to your lake to collect follow-up algal-toxin samples. We thought it was important to try to reduce any potential health risks to children participating in the fishing derby.

I think we learned a couple of important things about your lake as a result of that visit.  First, we learned that the blue-green algae forming scums in your lake do have the potential to produce toxins that exceed recreational thresholds. That is important so that when you see scums like you are currently experiencing, you can advise people to avoid the water in the scum area and to keep children and pets away also.

Secondly, we learned that although there may be toxins in the open water areas away from the scums, we found them to be very low compared to the scum areas.  It is always best to use professional judgement and to err on the side of caution if you want to recreate in natural lakes and ponds. If the water looks like it could be experiencing a cyanobacteria bloom, you should assume it is not safe to recreate in.

Just today, I received new information from USEPA on monitoring and responding to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in recreational waters that may be of interest to you. Information can be found at the following link https://www.epa.gov/nutrient-policy-data/monitoring-and-responding-cyanobacteria-and-cyanotoxins-recreational-waters?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery#t3.

———————————-

In response, Dunlap Lake Property Owners Association will be looking into the monitoring resources received today and the communications tools recently released to support those efforts. There are no commercial labs in the State of Illinois to do these analyses but there is an Illinois Voluntary Lake Monitoring program and national labs that may be able to test.

If you have the expertise to help develop a monitoring system, are interested in being on the safety committee, or can be out on the lake helping to monitor, please respond to this e-mail.

Remember: not seeing scum on top of the water does not automatically make the water safe. In the area with the high toxin levels, there was scum in the mornings and it was clear in the evenings. If you see scum please email manager@DunlapLake.org or call Carolyn Green to get a caution sign placed in the affected area to protect small children and pets by letting parents and owners know to keep them away from coves where scum has been sited. 

Test samples were both taken in the cove on the south side of Park Street per the GPS coordinates in the photo below.

EPA’s Report July 6, 2017

The EPA collected two samples on June 23rd. One was taken back along the shore where a blue-green algae bloom was reported and one was out in the mouth of the same cove. The level of microcystin (toxin) was:

  • 36.2 ug/L near the shore (as reported previously)
  • 0.38 ug/L In the mouth of the cove (as reported today)

Today’s e-mail from the EPA included these comments:
“Although microcystins were detected in this sample, they were detected at a much lower concentration compared to the sample collected near the resident’s dock (36.2 ug/L). The 0.38 ug/L concentration is well below all advisory thresholds associated with recreational risk due to microcystin exposure.

We are currently not planning to return to your lake to collect follow-up algal-toxin samples. We thought it was important to try to reduce any potential health risks to children participating in the fishing derby.

I think we learned a couple of important things about your lake as a result of that visit.  First, we learned that the blue-green algae forming scums in your lake do have the potential to produce toxins that exceed recreational thresholds. That is important so that when you see scums like you are currently experiencing, you can advise people to avoid the water in the scum area and to keep children and pets away also.

Secondly, we learned that although there may be toxins in the open water areas away from the scums, we found them to be very low compared to the scum areas.  It is always best to use professional judgement and to err on the side of caution if you want to recreate in natural lakes and ponds. If the water looks like it could be experiencing a cyanobacteria bloom, you should assume it is not safe to recreate in.

Just today, I received new information from USEPA on monitoring and responding to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in recreational waters that may be of interest to you. Information can be found at the following link https://www.epa.gov/nutrient-policy-data/monitoring-and-responding-cyanobacteria-and-cyanotoxins-recreational-waters?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery#t3.

———————————-

In response, Dunlap Lake Property Owners Association will be looking into the monitoring resources received today and the communications tools recently released to support those efforts. There are no commercial labs in the State of Illinois to do these analyses but there is an Illinois Voluntary Lake Monitoring program and national labs that may be able to test.

If you have the expertise to help develop a monitoring system, are interested in being on the safety committee, or can be out on the lake helping to monitor, please respond to this e-mail.

Remember: not seeing scum on top of the water does not automatically make the water safe. In the area with the high toxin levels, there was scum in the mornings and it was clear in the evenings. If you see scum please email manager@DunlapLake.org or call Carolyn Green to get a caution sign placed in the affected area to protect small children and pets by letting parents and owners know to keep them away from coves where scum has been sited. 

Test samples were both taken in the cove on the south side of Park Street per the GPS coordinates in the photo below.

 

Emergency Notification System

Bacteria, whether it be the cyanobacteria connected to plant life or bacteria from animals, is always present in the every lake. That is natural. But please be aware of the Association’s emergency notification system if something dangerous is identified. The Association has MANY communication channels but they are all ineffective if not monitored regularly.

  • E-mail notifications – update or add an address from the bottom of any past message. Share the link with neighbors or family members who can help you monitor lake news.
  • Website www.DunlapLake.org
  • Posting Place – A large signboard is under construction at 840 East Lake
Other Communications Channels include:
A beta-test of a new Dunlap Lake town-card, which works like an app to make news updates available on your phone. This digital card is available by texting LAKE to 63975. 
 

The Dunlap Lake Association Facebook page – be sure to follow the official Association page with the logo at www.facebook.com/DunlapLake/

Other contact options – Three people have signed up to be part of a phone tree. If anyone is interested in coordinating a phone outreach contact Carolyn Green at 791-1398. 

There is also the dlake.info discussion board. The discussion there has been instrumental in the current efforts to find buyers for the dirt from E8. Jim Lynch posted a new dredging proposal June 28 titled Lake Plan 2.21.

There are 10 street entrances and 350 homes at Dunlap Lake. Yard signs and direct mail are fine for events but monitoring e-mail, the website and the signboard are especially important during the summer months. 

Is It Safe To Swim July 4th Weekend?

June 30, 2017 — The Illinois EPA Bureau of Water, Lakes Unit, reported that they have received preliminary results for one of the microcystin samples that were collected near the boat dock behind 357 E. Lake Drive (see map below). The result was 36.2 ug/L, which exceeds the World Health Organization threshold for a high probability of adverse health effects during recreational contact (see chart below). It also exceeds USEPA’s draft recreational guidelines for no swimming.

If surface scum is present avoid all contact with the scum areas and any area that looks greatly discolored (very green). Keep pets away from the water. A test strip at the second location was negative but the EPA says conditions may have changed since samples were collected last Friday. Please observe water conditions and use good judgment before swimming. If it looks bad, it probably is not safe to swim in.

A sign that says CAUTION in red has been posted on the bank of the coves where residents reported possible blue-green algae blooms.  More about blue-green algae, more correctly known as cyanobacteria, is available at https://www.epa.gov/nutrient-policy-data/cyanohabs

Dock Sample – 36.2 ug/L lab confirmed
Cove Sample – Screening test was
     negative for microsystin.
     Lab confirmation not yet available